Best induction hobs on test 2024

It’s fair to say that induction hobs come with a slight stigma. The early iterations had a reputation for being fickle when it came to temperature control, which has unfortunately followed them over the years, and some hard and fast foodies believe cooking with fire is the only real way to cook.

However, these hobs have come impressively far, with many induction hob users celebrating them for being incredibly easy to control, quick to heat up and touting impressive energy-efficient credentials.

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With the right pans, there’s really nothing you can’t cook on an induction hob. From heating up hearty soups and gently cooked risotto to speedily cooked stir-fries and no-oven Sunday lunch recipes.

Whether you’re new to the world of induction hobs or you’re looking to replace your existing one, you’ll find everything you need within our ultimate induction hobs guide.

We’ve spoken to domestic white goods experts from Currys, AO.com and Appliances Direct, as well as advisors from UK Whitegoods to bring you the best induction hob suggestions, plus the best portable induction hobs to buy as tested by the BBC Good Food reviews team.

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Visit our reviews section and discover more than 600 practical buyers’ guides offering unbiased advice on what equipment is worth investing in. Find all the kit you need for your new induction hob, including the best pan sets and best frying frying pans, and other essential kit such as the best cast iron cookware and the best woks. All costs-to-run calculations were done against the variable tariff at the time of testing (34p/kWh), which has since changed – read more on the current energy price guarantee rates.

Best induction hobs at a glance

  • Best induction hob: Neff N50 T36FB41X0G, £509
  • Best budget induction hob: Hisense I6433C7, £229
  • Best energy-efficient induction hob: Samsung Infinite Range CombiHob NZ84T9747VK, £1,599
  • Best value induction hob: Hotpoint TQ1460SNE59, £249
  • Best smart induction hob: Samsung NZ64B4015FK, £509
  • Best induction hob for small households: Bosch Series 2 PUG61RAA5B, £311
  • Best induction hob for large households: Neff N70 T48FD23X2, £929
  • Best induction hob for unique features: Elecia NikolaTesla induction venting hob, £1,598.97
  • Best double portable induction hob: Amz Chef Double Induction Hob, £129.99
  • Best portable induction hob for fast results: VonShef Double Induction Hob, £89.99

Best induction hobs to buy in 2024

Neff N50 T36FB41X0G induction hob

Neff-N50-T36FB41X0G-induction-hob

Best induction hob

Top features

  • Four rings
  • Easy-to-use touchscreen
  • Programmable LED timer
  • Lockable control panel
  • Boost mode

This Neff induction hob is a speedy, powerful piece of kit, featuring an intuitive touchscreen and sleek, contemporary design. Its display panel is quick to respond and come with the added perk of a lock button, just in case any of the controls get knocked accidentally.

Each cooking zone gets to work when it detects the presence of an induction pan, heating just the pan rather than the surface of the hob – this means any accidental spillages don’t become burnt on and can be easily wiped away. For quick results, you can also select boost mode for an extra burst of heat.

Hisense I6433C7 induction hob

Hisense-I6433C7-induction-hob

Best budget induction hob

Top features

  • Four rings
  • Extendable cooking zone
  • Boost mode
  • Touchscreen controls
  • Residual heat indicator

Hisense is an excellent budget brand according to experts at UK Whitegoods, and this glass-ceramic model is no exception. At under £300 it offers an impressive amount of flexibility and space, and its power-boost mode is a bonus if you’re cooking meals in a hurry.

Like most induction hobs, it heats the pan rather than the surface area, which is good from a safety perspective. On the left-hand side of the hob, there’s a bridging zone that allows you to join two rings together to create a bigger cooking area – ideal if you’re using larger cookware. It also sports a sleek LCD display, so would integrate well into a contemporary kitchen.

Samsung Infinite Range CombiHob NZ84T9747VK venting hob

Samsung-Infinite-Range-CombiHob-NZ84T9747VK-venting-hob

Best energy-efficient induction hob

Top features

  • Four rings
  • Dual Flex zone
  • Built-in downward cooker hood
  • Programmable timer
  • Automatic shut-off
  • Lockable control panel
  • Boost mode

Where you choose to fit an induction hob in your kitchen can often be restricted by where your ventilation points are. This model eliminates that boundary with its built-in downdraft cook hood, which draws in steam from below and captures any odours as you cook. This means you can have the hob fixed onto any surface in your kitchen, without the need for a separate extractor fan.

It has good eco credentials, with an A+ energy rating and a five-year warranty. The Dual Flex zone is another great feature that increases the size of the cooking area, so you can use larger pots and pans. The hob itself has a sleek, clean appearance, with smooth surfaces that wipe clean easily and a handy timer that alerts you when everything is done.

Hotpoint TQ1460SNE electric induction hob

Hotpoint-TQ1460SNE-electric-induction-hob

Best value induction hob

Top features

  • Four rings
  • Easy-to-use touchscreen controls
  • Automatic switch-off
  • Lockable controls
  • Boost function
  • Four auto programmes

If you’re prone to the occasional culinary mishap, this Hotpoint induction hob comes with four automatic cooking methods that set the optimum temperature for specific ingredients, so you can better prevent any foods burning or sticking to the pan. Among them are boil, melt, slow cook, and keep warm, plus there’s a boost function if you need an extra blast of heat.

It’s sleek, touchscreen design is attractive and contemporary-looking, and there’s bonus safety features, too, like lockable controls, a residual heat indicator, and auto switch-off if there’s a spillage. It has also nine power levels and requires professional installation.

Samsung NZ64B4015FK/U1 electric induction smart hob

SAMSUNG NZ64B4015FKU1 59 cm Electric Induction Smart Hob

Best smart induction hob

Top features

  • Four rings
  • Boost function
  • Touch controls
  • WiFi-enabled
  • 15 power levels
  • Child-safety lock
  • Pause function

For those looking for a high-spec induction hob, this WiFi-enabled model from Samsung comes with a range of impressive features – including a pause function that lowers the temperature in case you need to go and do something else while cooking.

Elements of the hob can be also controlled remotely using the SmartThings app. For safety reasons you can’t switch the cooktop on or off via your phone, but you can set the timer, receive alerts, and check whether the hob rings are on when you’re not at home.

Its slim-fit design helps it slot seamlessly into the kitchen, and the oval-shaped cooking zones are ideal for those with bigger pots and pans. This hob also comes with a decent five-year guarantee.

Bosch Series 2 PUG61RAA5B electric induction hob

BOSCH Series 2 PUG61RAA5B 59 cm Electric Induction Hob

Best induction hob for small households

Top features

  • Four rings
  • Nine power settings
  • Boost function
  • QuickStart function
  • Plug & Play
  • Lockable controls

If you’re looking for an induction hob that simply plugs straight into the socket, this Bosch model is an excellent choice. Thanks to its Plug & Play design, it also uses a lower power output than a typical hardwired induction hob, so is ideal for households who frequently cook smaller meals.

The lockable controls keep the temperature settings fixed for as long as you need them to, in case of any accidental button-pushing. It has good user-friendly credentials too – the hob’s quick-start mode gets to work when it detects a pan has been placed down and lights up the control panel. Boost mode is a handy feature for ultra-quick results, and the surface doesn’t get hot during cooking either.

Neff N70T48FD23X2 electric induction hob

Neff-N70T48FD23X2-electric-induction-hob

Best induction hob for large households

Top features

  • Five rings
  • Boost function
  • Touch controls
  • Combi induction
  • Lockable controls
  • Auto switch-off

Ideal for larger households, this five-ring hob really delivers on the versatility front. It has two individual heating zones that can be combined to create one larger zone, and you can use the boost mode for faster heat when you need it.

You can adjust the temperature through movement – simply slide the pan backwards and forwards to increase or decrease the power levels, without touching any buttons. It also features control panel suspension, which blocks the controls for 30 seconds when it detects over-boiled liquids, so you can wipe over it without accidentally changing the settings.

If you accidentally switch the hob off, there’s a restart function that switches the hob on again and restores all your previous settings within four seconds. If you’re keeping an eye on energy costs, you can view the energy consumption of the last cooking process, too.

Elica NikolaTesla induction venting hob

Elica-NikolaTesla-induction-venting-hob

Best induction hob for unique features

Top features

  • Four rings
  • Built-in extractor fan
  • StopGo function
  • Pot detector
  • Temperature manager
  • Auto-capture function

If you have a higher budget to play with, this induction hob – complete with a built-in extractor fan – is particularly innovative versus others on the market. Experts at UK Whitegoods rated it highly, particularly on the reliability front, and its sleek, simple design means it integrates easily into a modern kitchen.

It’s installed with clever tech that ensures you’re never using more energy than you need to. The venting element of the hob adjusts automatically based on the number of cooking zones being used and their power setting, plus the hob rings never heat up until you’ve placed a pot on the induction ring.

There’s also a Stop-Go mode, which allows you to pause cooking and resume again exactly as before whenever you’re ready

Amzchef Double Induction Hob

Amz Chef Double Induction Hob

Best double portable induction hob

Star rating: 4/5

Pros:

  • Easy to use
  • Intuitive touchscreen controls
  • Looks great on the countertop
  • Ample space for a variety of pan sizes

Cons:

  • Less efficient to run
  • Mostly non-recyclable packaging
  • Less responsive to temperature changes that others tested

Wattage: Right hob 1800W, left hob 1000W
Cost during test: Right hob 9.21p, left hob 4.96p for 10 minutes

Earning the award for best double portable induction hob, this ultra attractive induction hob is a sleek addition to the kitchen. It’s also slim and lightweight, making it easy to store when not in use. The touchscreen controls sit flush to the surface and are very responsive to touch, and the smooth surface is very easy to clean.

Boasting plenty of space around each hob ring, this induction hob allows you to move pans around with ease. This hob was neither fast nor slow when it came to heating a litre of water: it took five minutes to do so. We also found it provided even and consistent heat as evidenced by the gentle browning of our caramel.

Reactiveness was this model’s downfall, as unfortunately milk boiled over on our test as it takes around 2 seconds to react to changes in temperature. But by that time it was too late and we were left with a significant puddle to clean up. Thankfully however, the hob rings do not get hot enough to burn the milk on, so clean up was a doddle.

Read our full Amz Chef double induction hob review.

VonShef Double Induction Hob

VonShef Double Induction Hob

Best portable induction hob for fast results

Star rating: 4/5

Pros:

  • Very quick to boil
  • Rings are large enough for a variety of pan sizes
  • Looks attractive
  • Good safety features
  • Great value

Cons:

  • Expensive to run
  • Large footprint
  • Noisy
  • Less reactive to reductions in temperature

Wattage: 2800W
Cost during test: 8.84p for 10 minutes

If you’re after an induction hob that delivers rapid results, this VonShef model is the speediest on the list. It took just 2 minutes 20 seconds to boil a litre of water; an impressive time that rivals the humble kettle.

Like the model above, the glass top is smooth and has clear, touchscreen controls. The majority of the controls are intuitive, other than the timer, which took a couple of attempts to master.

The fan, that sits on the underside on the bottom left, is very noisy, and when using the higher temperatures, it whirrs even louder.

We were left disappointed by the poor reaction to temperature changes, which meant milk boiled over on our test. We also found the sugar melted faster than we expected on our caramel test, which is brilliant for confident cooks, but the majority would appreciate a more controlled cook, particularly when dealing with sugar.

Read our full VonShef double induction hob review.

What is an induction hob?

An induction hob is a flat, glass-topped plate that uses heat created by magnetism to warm pots and pans, rather than direct heat (gas hobs) or heated plates (electric hobs).

Beneath the glass surface of induction hobs sit coils that an alternating electrical current runs through. When an induction-compatible pan (magnetised pan) is placed onto the surface of the hob, a magnetic field is created between the coils and the pan, causing an electrical current to run through it. This electrical current is then converted into heat to cook whatever is in the pan.

A quick way to check whether your pan is induction compatible is to place a magnet on the underside. If the magnet sticks then it’ll work on induction, if it does not, then it won’t.

Ceramic hob versus induction hob

Induction hobs

Pros:

  • Energy-efficient option
  • Responsive to changes in temperature
  • Safe to use – surface doesn’t stay hot
  • Easy to clean

Cons:

  • Can be expensive
  • Not suitable for all pans
  • Glass surface is prone to scratches

Ceramic hobs

Pros:

  • Cheaper to buy than induction
  • Easy to clean (though you have to wait for it to cool down)
  • Can be used with any cookware

Cons:

  • Slow to heat up
  • Retains heat, so slow to respond to changes in temperature
  • Not as safe as induction as the surface stays hot after use
  • Glass surface prone to scratches

Are induction hobs energy efficient?

The short answer is, yes. Induction hobs are more energy efficient than their gas and electric counterparts. If you think about how induction hobs actually work, it’s easy to see why. Where pans on gas hobs sit on top of cast iron racks or rings there’s a considerable portion of space where unused heat is expelled into the surroundings, whereas on an induction hob, the entire base of the pan has contact with the hob top, so all of the electric current that’s used to produce the heat goes into the pan.

And further to this, once the pan is removed, the heat is no longer produced. For context, a study by the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy found with induction hobs “up to 90% of the energy consumed is transferred to the food, compared to about 74% for traditional electric systems and 40% for gas.”

Induction hobs are also considerably faster than other hob types. Take boiling a litre of water, for example: of the induction hobs we tested, the fastest took just 2 minutes 20 seconds to come to a boil compared to 13 minutes 15 seconds on a gas hob. The number will vary hob to hob, but as a general rule of thumb, induction is faster.

How to clean an induction hob

The flat, smooth surface of an induction hob makes them the easiest hob type to clean. Simply wipe up any spills with a damp cloth as you would your work surface. Unlike gas or electric hobs, mess is unlikely to become burned on as induction hobs rarely reach hot enough temperatures.

However, if you’re not diligent when cleaning, any spills that aren’t cleaned up on the ring may become fused to the surface if you cook with a pan on top of them. If this happens, a slightly tougher approach may be needed. Razors or scrapers can be bought directly from the hob manufacturer – use this in conjunction with washing-up liquid and water to scrape the scorched bits away.

What pans can you use on an induction hob?

In the “What is an induction hob?” section we explained how an induction hob works. Therefore, any pans with a metal element in the base will work on an induction hob. Pans made from cast iron and some alloys of stainless steel will naturally work on an induction hob. Cookware made from aluminium, glass and copper will not work because they do not contain a metal that reacts to a magnetic field.

Some brands counteract this by including an iron plate on the underside of their aluminium or copper pans. It’s always best to check whether the pans you’re looking to buy are induction compatible. We always include their compatibility in our cookware product round-ups.

Our guide to the best frying pans and the best pan sets offer great examples for safe use on induction hobs.

best induction hobs

How we tested portable induction hobs

We scoured the market for a range of different portable induction hobs. We wanted budget-friendly models, compact models, and models worth the investment. Both single and double portable induction hobs are included in this list, and both were tested using the same standardised criteria.

Our tests involved bringing water to the boil, seeing how reactive the induction hobs are to temperature changes, making BBC Good Food’s caramel sauce and allowing the molten sugar to show us any hot spots, as well as cleaning the hob.

With many of us wanting to be more enlightened about how much our appliances actually cost to run, we conducted a simple test. The average cost per kilowatt hour for fixed rate tariff customers was 34p/kWh at the time of testing, so we cooked pasta for 10 minutes on a rolling boil, and recorded the cost to run for that single unit of time. The cost to run for 10 minutes for each hob is recorded above.

All induction hobs were scored against the following criteria:

  • Sustainability: We looked at the materials and packaging of each product – if it was not recyclable or sustainable, the product lost points.
  • Cost to run: We asked whether the induction hob was costly or relatively cheap to run based on our 10 minute pasta-boiling test.
  • Value for money: Is the performance of the product and its various features consistent with the price?
  • Ease of use: We looked for practical, straightforward and intuitive hobs. Any elements that felt overcomplicated or in any way confusing meant the hob was marked down.
  • Results: When peering into the saucepan, we wanted to see consistent bubbles, even heat distribution, a hob that brought water to the boil quickly, and one that was reactive to temperature changes.
  • Quality of design features: Sturdy and robust design always makes sense. We also looked for appropriate safety features, bright, well-lit control panels, and useful, but not annoying, sounds and alerts.

For more information on our test processes, read our behind the scenes piece on how we test and review products.

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If you have any questions, suggestions for future reviews or spot anything that has changed in price or availability please get in touch at goodfoodwebsite@immediate.co.uk.

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